Is it possible for men with penile implants to have enhanced erections by using E.D. medication?

Posted on 10. Nov, 2009 by Mel G.

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Viagra is a commercial produced medicine conta...
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The simple answer is yes, however this is not based on solid medical findings but surveys on men done across the country over the last 10 years.

In essence, some medication use to treat E.D. can stimulate residual penile tissue that still exists in a man with an implant and that tissue can as a result expand, thereby increasing the man’s erection.

Clinical research is still being done to discover whether Viagra taken in conjunction with pellets (MUSE) or injections can additionally enhance a man’s ability to have an erection.

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What are pellets (MUSE)?

Posted on 08. Nov, 2009 by Mel G.

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6mm plastic BBs (0.12 g). A sample of inexpens...
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Pellets are medically used in a procedure known as trans urethral therapy.

Essentially this procedure is involves a small pellet of a medication that is put directly into the urethra to simulate an erection. The urethra is the tube that runs through the penis and carries urine from the bladder and out through the tip of the penis.

Today, the most commonly used pellet by urologists is called “MUSE”
(medicated urethral system for erection) which is about the size of a grain of rice. In the MUSE pellet, there is a chemical called “alprostadi” which is a synthetic form of a naturally occurring hormone found in the penis that dilates the blood vessels and creates an erection.

Some side effects of the Muse include slight throbbing and burning sensation during and immediately following insertion of the pellet, dizziness and rapid pulse, and female partners of men who use the MUSE have reported experiencing mild vaginal itching after sex. It should be noted that men who use the MUSE pellet should not drive for at least an hour after first using the pellet.

On average, pellets give most men an erection within five to ten minutes. Typically, pellets are prescribed over other treatments and drugs by urologists to men who either cannot take E.D. drugs or for men who have severe cases of E.D. who have not had success achieving erections after using oral medication.

Doctors will prescribe MUSE for patients suffering from E.D. who have vascular disease, diabetes or heart disease as these individuals cannot take other oral medications. While the MUSE has been found to be effective in only 30% to 60% of men, doctors recommend that it not be used by men in certain instances.

For example, MUSE should not be used by those who have hypersensitivity or allergic reactions to the chemical alprostadil, by men with any deformity of the penis, or by men who suffer from sickle cell anemia, leukemia, or multiple myeloma. Typically urologists will not recommend a treatment that involves both the use of pellets and taking oral E.D. medication, unless a patient has had very serious and prolonged problems with E.D.

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What about injections? How do they work?

Posted on 05. Nov, 2009 by Mel G.

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25ml re-usable glass hypodermic syringe, and i...
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A drug is injected directly into the shaft of the penis prior to a man having sexual intercourse. Although it sounds a bit worrying it is easy to learn.

The medication usually works within about 15 minutes. Even though many men may be uncomfortable injecting themselves, expert believe injections are perhaps the fastest method for men with E.D. to achieve an erection.

The most popular E.D. injection used today is called “Caverject”. This method involves a small-needle injected into the corpus cavernosum in the penis and by relaxing smooth muscle tissue it in turn enhances the blood flow to the penis, creating an erection. Typically doctors prescribe the injection for men with E.D. that is neurological, vascular, and psychological or of mixed origin.

Men treated with Caverject receive initial injections from medically-trained personnel to determine optimum dosing from 5 mg to 20 mg. Up to 60 mg can be injected at one time and Caverject can be administered by the patient himself once he has been trained to self-inject. The syringes are self-contained, easy to use and also come with a kit that contains the alcohol wipes used before and after to clean the penis.

It should be noted that Caverject may cause mild pain, irritation or slight bleeding at the injection site and also a possibility of tenderness or swelling of the penis as well as redness, lumps, or an unusual curving of the penis.

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How often are hormone treatments the solution to E.D.?

Posted on 21. Oct, 2009 by Mel G.

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Hormonal problems are rarely the cause of impotence. The most common hormone abnormality is reduced levels of the male sex hormone testosterone. Testosterone can be restored to a therapeutic level with hormone replacement therapy. Testosterone replacement therapy should only be taken if you are tested and these tests confirm a deficiency.

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Can a man on blood pressure or diabetes medication still use drugs to effectively treat E.D.?

Posted on 18. Oct, 2009 by Mel G.

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Under pressure
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There have been clinic tests that have shown men taking other medications for other conditions such as diabetes, have had success in treating their E.D. with drugs like Viagra.

However, men who take nitrates or heart related medications are not prescribed E.D. related medications because their mixture can be lethal. Men taking certain medications must inform and consult their physicians before taking E.D. medications.

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How do you know if a product that claims to cure or fix Erectile Dysfunction is the real deal?

Posted on 16. Oct, 2009 by Mel G.

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When it comes to health care or medical products that promise results, especially those concerning E.D., the Federal Trade Commission offers these tips for evaluating claims you may want to believe and should be careful about:

• If the product is advertised as effective for treating impotence and no physician’s prescription is necessary, forget it, this product mostly likely won’t cure the condition.

• If the product is advertised as a “breakthrough” in treating impotence, check with your doctor to see if it is legitimate.

• If the product is promoted by a “medical organization,” call your physician to check the credentials. Phony “clinics” and sham “institutes” are touting bogus cures for impotence.

• If the product says “scientifically proven” to reverse impotence in a high percentage of patients, check it out with your doctor. Some claims that “clinical studies” prove a product works are often exaggerated or false.

Generally high success rates should raise suspicions and if the product being pitched to cure impotence is “herbal” or “all natural,” dismiss it. To date, no “herbal” or “all natural” substance has been shown to be an effective treatment for E.D. (Source: http://ftc.gov/)

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How does Ejaculation Occur?

Posted on 26. Sep, 2009 by Mel G.

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Mechanism of Ejaculation
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Ejaculation is the release of semen from the penis due to sexual stimulation during sex.

Ejaculation occurs when the semen is released from the prostate to the seminal vessels. After the semen is released, the muscles around the urethra push the semen through the urethra and out of the penis.

Sexual arousal causes nerves in the penis to send chemicals through the spinal cord to the brain. When a man reaches a certain level of excitement during this process, chemical and nerve messages sent from the brain to the pelvis cause the process of ejaculation. While it is not completely understood, medical researchers believe that the chemical serotonin released in the brain is a substantial component to the feeling of euphoria created during and after sex in men.

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What are the Components of Semen?

Posted on 21. Sep, 2009 by Mel G.

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Semen is the fluid released from the penis upon ejaculation and is made up of two things: sperm from the vas deferens and seminal fluid. Seminal fluid contains fluid from the prostate gland and seminal vesicles. On average, each man’s ejaculate normally releases between 50 and 500 million sperm. However, these sperm make up only about 2% to 5% of the volume of semen itself. The bulk of the semen is made up of seminal fluid.

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What are the Phases of an Orgasm?

Posted on 18. Sep, 2009 by Mel G.

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There are four phases before any man or woman achieves an orgasm:
AROUSAL
This stage is when a person becomes sexually excited or stimulated both mentally and physically. Signs can include an increased heart rate, flushing of the skin, increased sensitivity in the genital area, erection of the penis, swelling of the clitoris, and lubrication of the vagina.
PLATEAU
This stage involves increased sexual and muscle tension that doesn’t change.
ORGASM
In essence, during this stage sexual pleasure reaches its highest point and then sexual tension is released.
RECOVERY
This last stage is where the body returns to a state of normality. Typically, most men and women feel a sense of warmth, pleasure and relaxation during this stage.

It should be noted that the time after a man ejaculates (achieves orgasm) and the time he is able to achieve another orgasm varies from man to man.

Typically, younger men are able to have an erection must faster and can ejaculate more times than older men. On the other hand, women are able to have orgasms in increased numbers and remain in the plateau phase for a longer period of time than men.

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